Plant Native provides a list of trees suitable for growing in our area.


The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center-The University of Texas at Austin website also offers extensive information on native trees and plants suitable for New York State.


+ How to select the right trees to plant in the right place

According to Cornell University “Gardening Resources”, native plants are favored for the following reasons: lower maintenance, regional uniqueness, biological diversity and suitability as wildlife habitat.

Additionally, it is important to consider whether the plant is appropriate for the site: is the space, microclimate, soil type, soil hydrology and insect populations appropriate for the plant?

For more information on tree selection and placement, visit treesaregood.com.


To learn more about gardening with native plants:

Bowman Hill Wild Flower Preserve


For tips on selecting an arborist:

usna.usda.gov



For full information on the Village of Tuxedo Park:

tuxedopark-ny.gov


To order Tuxedo Park nature prints:

Greg Miller Photography


To order the full color, illustrated book that celebrates the beauty of Tuxedo Park’s landscape, flora and fauna:

Tuxedo Park: The Gift of Nature


To contact our utility company about trees:

Orange & Rockland

 

Did you know?

Lawn and other fertilizers containing phosphorus are banned by law in Tuxedo Park. Read more.



Oak tree killing disease found in Brooklyn and Long Island: help prevent it from coming to Tuxedo Park by not pruning your oak trees until winter. Read more.


+ How to remove the invasive Hercules Club (Japanese Angelica)

Removal method: unfortunately, targeted basal bark application of the herbicide Pathfinder II before August (when the seeds start spreading) is the only solution. For safety reasons, the treatment is best performed by a licensed professional.

NEVER CUT THIS TREE because it will encourage rapid new growth via the root system.

*An invasive species threatens the environment by out-competing native plants, resulting in a monoculture that does not attract native insects and birds.


+ How to remove the invasive Goutweed

Removal method: hand pull, then cover with geotextile fabric, weighed down by logs, for up to a year to stifle new growth.

Placing cut timber on the ground in a pleasing pattern also slows storm water runoff, provides a habitat for animals, insects and birds, and puts nutrients back into the soil as the wood disintegrates.

*An invasive species threatens the environment by out-competing native plants, resulting in a monoculture that does not attract native insects and birds.


+ How to remove the invasive Japanese Knotweed

Removal method: unfortunately, targeted foliar application of the herbicide Pathfinder II before August (when the seeds start spreading) is the only solution. For safety reasons, the treatment is best performed by a licensed professional.

*An invasive species threatens the environment by out-competing native plants, resulting in a monoculture that does not attract native insects and birds.


+ The “good looking” grass, Miscanthus, is in fact a pernicious invasive species!

This grass, which occupies an extensive area of the Race Track Nature Preserve, is in fact an aggressive invasive plant.

It will be removed in stages – by mowing over several seasons, beginning summer 2017. When the area is cleared of this invasive plant, it will be replanted with native grasses and flowers.

An invasive species threatens the environment by out-competing native plants, resulting in a monoculture that does not attract native insects and birds.


For more information on invasive species:

USDA National Invasive Species Information Center



+ To help safeguard New York’s forest from growing threat posed by firewood infested with invasive insects and/or diseases, a State regulation is now in effect.

  • Bans importing firewood into New York unless it has been kiln-dried to eliminate pests;

  • Prohibits the movement of untreated firewood within New York more than 50 miles from its source.

To protect New York’s trees, please:

  • Leave firewood at home – do not transport it to campgrounds or parks or dispose of them on roadside or in forests;

  • Only buy firewood that has been harvested locally or treated (kiln-dried) for pests;

  • Burn all firewood brought to a camp ground.


+ To report tree diseases and/or suspicious findings

Call Forest Health Diagnostics Lab, Division of Lands and Forests, DEC (518) 478 7813

foresthealth@dec.ny.gov

Forest pest information: Toll-free: 1-866 640 0652

dec.ny.gov/lands/79716.html